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NDIS & Depression

NDIS & Depression

 

When someone is feeling persistently down with no interest in anything that once made them happy, they may be experiencing something more than short-lived sadness. People feel sadness from time to time and often and it is often short-lived. But for those that experience persistent depressed mood, lack of interest, or pleasure and this becomes intense and persist for at least 2 weeks, then it might be good idea to speak to a psychologist or your doctor that may assist to rule out if you have something called depression.

Depression can present itself in different ways and can be influenced by gender, age and a person’s cultural background etc. However, some of the more common symptoms of depression may include;

Depressed mood, most of the day nearly everyday

lack of interest or pleasure in all or most of your usual activities

  • lack of sleep or increase sleep
  • significant changes in your weight
  • loss of energy or fatigue most days
  • feelings of worthlessness
  • feeling guilty about things
  • difficulty concentrating
  • suicidal thoughts or attempts

It is important to note that these symptoms are not only experienced by the person feeling depressed but also perceived by others, such as your family and friends. Depression may also occur because of an underlying medical condition, substance use or other reasons which your psychologist or doctor may discuss with you.

Although depression is very common, there are therapies that may assist to better manage your your symptoms. Sometimes the symptoms of depression fade away once the stressor has been removed and other times psychological therapy is needed with the support of a psychologist.

At the Wellness Psychology Clinic we have experience working with people with depression, and can help you better manage your symptoms associated with depression.

References:
  1. American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Washington DC: Author.
  2. Australian Psychological Society. (n.d.). Depression. Australian Psychological Society. Retrieved 2 7, 2021, from https://www.psychology.org.au/for-the-public/Psychology-topics/Depression
  3. Black Dog Institute. (n.d.). Depression. Black Dog Institute. Retrieved 2 7, 2021, from https://www.blackdoginstitute.org.au/resources-support/depression/

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